Real Answers from Real Pilots

V-22 Time

Hello gentlemen. Great forum and thanks for sharing. This question mostly pertains to the Majors. I’m a USMC MV-22 Pilot. I have 1200hrs MV-22, 150hrs C-12, 100hrs T-34, handful of Helo time, and 80ish hours general aviation time. I decided to stay Active Duty for another 3 years due to opportunities that couldn’t be passed and to try to reach the 2,000TT before moving on and getting hired by one of the Majors. Flight leadership/instructor background; 3 combat deployments, Weapons and Tactics Instructor, Air Mission Commander, Standardization and Instrument Instructor/Evaluator.

Right now V-22 time is considered “Powered-Lift” instead of FW, although I cannot find an FAA examiner that can sign off on a powered-lift ATP since there still isn’t a civilian version. A bunch of us are flying on the side as CFI/II’s to build the 250 FW PIC required for the ME FW ATP in order to take the practical (written complete) since our PIC/SIC in the V-22 currently is not allowed to be counted towards FW ME. Allegedly, the FAA plans on counting Osprey and Harrier time towards FW in the next few years.

Until that happens, are any of you familiar with your organizations’ acceptance or rulings towards counting V-22 time towards multi-engine turbine time? If so, are they counting our full time or only a portion of flight time for when we are in “airplane” mode?

It’s a bit of a conundrum because we fly a “fixed-wing” multi-engine, crew served, digital cockpit aircraft at 240-280kts, but with the option to land via a hover or conventionally to a runway up to 100kts just like most FW aircraft. We also go through the same flight school pipeline as C-130 and P-3 pilots, with the addition of a few months in helo school.

Thank you very much. I look forward to your responses and can answer any MV-22 questions for my fellow aviators in the forum.

Card

Hi Sergio,

Honestly I have no idea but I will inquire (I won’t be in the office for another week so could be a little bit). That said since the Majors all require an ATP I’m thinking that’s the bigger issue. Fortunately you have 3yrs and hopefully the FAA will come up with something more definitive by then.

Stay safe,

Adam

Sergio,

You find yourself in an interesting scenario. I am not in anyway involved with the hiring at United, so I can’t really answer that question. I would recommend going to some of the job fairs that the major airlines are present at and talking with the recruiters there, they can give you definitive answers. The good news is that the airlines like hiring military pilots and are generally pretty understanding that the military world can be vastly different from the civilian world.

Chris