Real Answers from Real Pilots

Questions on becoming a commercial airline pilot

I have 0 flying experience and a high school diploma. I have read that education does matter at the major airline companies when thinning out applicants. Can you do the 1500 hours as a flight instructor in a 2 year time period? What is the best type of flight school to attend in the USA? Do certain schools have a recommendation system to major airlines like I have read some UK schools do?

Basically I am asking the fastest step by step, even if difficult, way to work for a major airline company starting from scratch?

D,

Yes, education matters when applying to the US major airlines. Most major airlines will not even look at an applicant that does not have a four year college degree, so if the majors are your goal, I would plan on getting a degree.

Yes, it is possible to (and many people do) complete the 1,500 hours in a two year time period, as long as you are working for a flight school that is busy and has a fair number of students.

Flight schools do not generally recommend students to major airlines as by the time a pilot is applying to the majors, flight school is a distant memory. The majors want to see thousands of hours of flight time and most people build that time at the regionals.

You barely gave any information about yourself, but I would surmise that the fastest path to a major for you would be to attend a fast track school and get all of your ratings, then instruct to build your 1,500 hours. After you get hired at a regional, you could start work on your college degree online. Overall, you are looking at 6-10 years until you get to a major, but that is just a rough estimate and is subject to change widely.

Chris

Thanks for your reply. I am 25 so 6-10 years does not seem to be a problem. The hardest part is the financial part. Do majors care where you went to flight school or where you got a degree at?

No, as long as your degree is from an accredited and reputable university, the field on study and the school name do not really matter.

Chris