Real Answers from Real Pilots

Multi Engine time as instructor/E6B

Hello,

Multi part question here: I’ve been advised not to do the 100 multi-engine program (do 40 instead) if I plan on being an instructor for ATP because I will build multi engine time as an instructor. How much time do you spend instructing multi-engine vs single engine? In other words how much multi engine time will you come out with at the end, having just gone through the 40 hour program, instructed for ATP, and flown your 1500 hrs TT? Also, (dumb question alert) does 100% of your instructor time count toward the 1500 hrs required for the airlines (even though you’re not the one always flying)? Next question is…during the program, having already completed the PPL cert, will you be expected to use a mechanical E6B?

Respectfully,
David

David,

  1. There are many variables based on what students you have when and at what phase of training etc. Regardless should easily end up with a few hundred ME hrs which will more than satisfy the Regional requirement.

  2. Yes, you’re instructing you log 100% of the flight time as technically on those flights you’re PIC (Pilot in Command).

  3. The answer is maybe? While in most cases you shouldn’t have to, an examiner always has the right to query you on material from previous ratings. While I honestly never saw it happen, it definitely could. Particularly on your CFI.

Adam

David,

I left ATP with about 420hrs ME time logged (~320hrs as an instructor). I would say that 300-500hrs is the average amount of ME time an ATP instructor logs.

Yes, all of your instruction (AKA “Dual Given”) hours count toward your total time.

And with regards to the E6B, I will put it this way. You are expected to know how to use the standard E6B throughout the whole program. Some CFIs and DPEs will not mind that you use an electronic E6B but some will specifically want to see you are able to use old school materials. I would recommend you build your foundation on the manual E6B and not the electronic one.

Yarden

All, thanks for those answers. Yarden, so you could likely find yourself in flight (beyond PPL) with a paper chart out, a stop watch, and a mech E6B?

Respectfully
David

David,

Not to get overly philosophical, but whether you’re preparing for a written, an oral, a practical (or life itself) there are often 2 schools of thought. Study/prepare just enough and hope that suffices OR study/prepare in excess, expect the worse and be pleasantly surprised how easy it was. The choice is yours but I know which one I pick :slight_smile:

Adam

:+1::smile:

I required all my private solo prep students to use those things when I was an instructor. I know most examiners also require private pilot applicants to demonstrate the use of the mechanical E6B during the oral portion of the checkride.

Beyond PPL some examiners allow the use of digital devices such as the electric E6B and electronic charts on Foreflight, but I seen a few cases where Commercial applicants couldn’t get past the oral because they “forgot” how to calculate a wind correction angle or where to find the parachute jumping information in the AF/D.

Yarden

Thanks everyone for the wise words. Looks like I’ll have to dust off the old E6B :slight_smile:

Respectfully
Dave