Real Answers from Real Pilots

January 2017 Schedule

  1. Off
  2. EWR-MBJ, MBJ-EWR
  3. EWR-TPA, TPA-DEN
  4. DEN-EWR
  5. Off
  6. Off
  7. Off
  8. Off
  9. Off
  10. EWR-SAN
  11. SAN-SFO
  12. SFO-ATL .ATL-SFO
  13. Off
  14. Off
  15. EWR-LAS
  16. LAS-LAX, LAX-IAD
  17. IAD-SJU
  18. SJU-EWR
  19. Off
  20. Off
  21. Off
  22. Off
  23. Off
  24. EWR-EGE
  25. EGE-EWR, EWR-BOS
  26. BOS-IAD, IAD-LAX
  27. LAX-MCO, MCO-EWR
  28. Off
  29. EWR-PDX
  30. PDX-DEN
  31. DEN-BOS
1 Like

Thank you for posting. I can’t remember what you said, do you commute? Thanks,

Brian

Brian,

I do a mix of commuting and living in New Jersey. When I commute it is from either SBN or ORF. I am based in EWR.

Chris

1 Like

When you are commuting (you personally) do you stay in a hotel or participate in a crash pad?

1 Like

Earv,

In the past I have used crashpads and was as pleased with it as one can be with a crashpad. I have also occasionally used hotels, but those costs can add up rather quickly so a crashpad was always my preferred method.

Chris

Chris,

When your leg terminates away from your base, i.e. Jan 12 ended in SFO, and you have days off afterwards, 1) do you normally hop a ride back home that night; 2) Understanding the seniority piece, but do you have priority, since you terminated outside of your base; 3) It depends on the location and time you arrived.

Thanks

Ryan

Ryan,

When you finish your flying assignments at an airport other than your base it is the company’s responsibility to get you back to your base, this is known as “deadheading”. When deadheading the company provides a positive space seat, meaning that it is just like any other passenger ticket. Sometimes that ticket will be for the same day, sometimes it will be for the next as the FAA rest rules still apply, although you can waive them if deadheading, which most pilots do.

Chris

If you commute to work can you deadhead to and/or from your first/last flight? Or do they make you return to your home base as a rule and then you still have to commute to where you live?

How often do you find yourself on a deadhead to either start or end a trip?

Ryan

Ryan,

As always it depends. Depending on the airline and the operation and whether you’re a lineholder or not. The problem is if for some reason your schedule changes (more likely to happen on reserve) or the flight cancels you’re potentially in trouble. Remember if you’re on reserve you’re required to be in base when you’re on call. Now if you’re a lineholder at many airlines you can call scheduling and ask. Depending on the airline and often YOUR relationship with them (yes they play favorites) you can get their ok, get released and go home or straight to your flight.

As for the frequency again that really depends on the airline and the operation. At some it’s quite common, other’s it’s nonexistent.

Adam

Ryan,

The only way you can deadhead from your home to start or end your trip is if the trip is scheduled to start or end with a deadhead. For example, if the last leg of my trip is a deadhead from DEN to EWR then I can skip EWR and deadhead straight home to SBN.

That being said, deadheads are pretty rare as the company tries to keep them to a minimum. A deadhead is pure cost to the company, so they really try to avoid them.

On a regular trip without any deadheads you will need to find your own way to and from your base.

Chris

Gentlemen,

I understand you always want to maintain a professional appearance. But, as far as deadhead attire, are you required to wear your pilot’s uniform, company shirt and slacks, clothes of choice (to a point)? Or is it airline dependent?

Ryan

Ryan,

Some airlines may require uniform, but none that I’ve ever seen. As you said you always want to maintain a professional appearance and most have guidance for DHing (usually collared shirt, slacks and no sneakers). Personally I’m lazy and since most DHs happen right before or after the trip I usually just keep my uniform on.

Adam